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Full text of "The manufacture and properties of iron and steel"

352
METALLURGY OP IRON AND STEEL.
that the number is as nearly equal as possible on each side. An unequal number is due solely to the fact that several heats have the same content, and these must all be placed either on one or the other side of the line.
TABLE XVII-E.
Properties with Different Contents of Manganese.
Made by The Pennsylvania Steel Company.
'		s&S					a		43	c?		
	.	JSg1		fl	3 <C		ID	«   • .	^	FH		a
	"3	3~p,	M	i	5	§ •	*3 £3 o «ftri	rt «> 2 Sftfl	n&	O		
p.	SH O	In •	Ofl r=)S ft°	?. 2 ®	J>	sg &°	|||	111	43 CO	•2g «8	»*fl o * 3°	*i
			0 M					m 2 3		9 M	n ^	
8	5	^ MP*9	O05 flft	®§	§	M*3*	SftM	3p,§?	Ofl	tj (D	«S rH P4	J.S
o	M	Hi		P3	fc	«	t>	W	H	P§		02
i	Acid	55000 to 60000	.08	Low High	7 6	.80 .87	57922 58881	8869S 88598	29.91 28.08	59.02 57.07	66.8 65^	% diam.
ii	Basic	55000 to 63000	.03	Low High	11 11	.44 .57	58005 59563	88547 40183	80.16 80.86	60.21 58.55	66.5 67.4	2^
in	Acid	60000 to 65000	.08	Low High	16 14	.35 .51	62180 62605	41308 41169	28.00 27.65	50.89 54.66	66.4 65.8	% diam.
IV	Acid	65000 to 70000	.08	Low High	26 82	.51 .78	67421 68192	43923 45854	25.96 25.82	51.29 51.50	65.1 67.2	% diam.
V	Acid	70000 to 75000	.08	Low High	18 25	.60 .91	72353 72115	46836 48359	24.23 24.63	47.79 47.73	64.7 67.1	% diam.
VI	Acid	75000 to 80000	.06	Low High	11 11	.65 .84	77520 78083	49411 50226	22.34 23.63	44.42 48.49	68.7 64.3	% diam.
VII	Acid	80000 to 85000	.08	Low High	9 9	.68 .82	81747 81860	51219 52231	20.63 22.67	41.04 47.75	62.7 63.8	% diam.
VIII	Acid	85000 to 90000	.08	Low High	5 5	.75 .83	86460 88084	54517 55409	20.41 20.66	40.56 41.92	68.1 62.9	% diam.
There is no marked difference between the steels of high and low manganese., and the eight different groups are so uniform that the work of chance must be almost absent. These records, however, do not take into account the important quality of resistance to shock. It has always been a problem to devise a satisfactory test in this direction, but the method is yet to be found. A few crude experiments which I performed on steel of high manganese, to see .how it would act under shock, are given in Table XVII-F. The bar was struck while in tension with a copper hammer, each blow being powerful enough to have permanently bent the bar if it had not been continually straightened by the action of the machine. One of the effects of this hammering is to momentarily loosen the